• March

    Sacramento District Employee Photo Contest

    The Sacramento District recently held an employee photo contest to showcase their skill with a camera. We received more than 100 entries from across the district. The photos were voted on during our annual holiday party and the top three will be framed and displayed in our headquarters building in Downtown Sacramento.Bronze Medal Photo: Half Dome
  • February

    Port Chicago – The most solemn memorial you’ll never visit

    During World War II, where did the biggest loss of life on U.S. soil take place? Most people immediately think of the attack on Pearl Harbor and answer Hawaii. But that is incorrect. Hawaii didn’t even become a U.S. state until 1959. The biggest loss of life on U.S. soil during World War II took place in 1944 at what was then known as Port Chicago,
  • A new take on searching for munitions takes flight

    On a recent sunny California winter day, approximately 25 people gathered in a scenic and rural field to watch a demonstration that could change the way potentially dangerous munitions are found. Under the supervision of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District, a team of contractors fired-up a tri-blade, Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)
  • Employee Spotlight: Kellie Cochran

    Please introduce yourselfMy name is Kellie Cochran. I was born and raised in Dillon, Colorado, a small mountain town in the Central Rockies. I grew up skiing, hiking, and doing all things outdoors. After graduating from high school, I moved to San Luis Obispo, California, to attend Cal Poly. I spent five years studying civil and environmental
  • November

    The Corps’ RAMS program helps restore land, keep people safe from abandoned mines

    Abandoned mines scattered throughout the United States present potentially dangerous public safety and environmental hazards. Open mine shafts, unstable passages, acid drainage, toxic air, and leftover explosive materials are just some of the hazards commonly associated with abandoned mine sites. Mines often fill with toxic water as rains flow in
  • October

    Employee Spotlight: Uriel Lopez, Jr.

    Please introduce yourself:My name is Uriel Lopez, Jr. I am a recent graduate from Chico State University, where I received my Bachelors of Science in Recreation Administration with an option in Parks and Natural Resource Management. I am a Park Ranger at Englebright Lake in Smartsville, California. I am currently assigned to the Sacramento District
  • Multi-Hazard Tournament game play provides real world solutions

    By J. Paul Bruton and Hunter MerrittIs it okay for employees to spend an entire workday playing games? Well, if they got together to play Scrabble or have a Candy-Crush tournament, the answer, of course would be a resounding “No!” But what if the event that brought these organizations together under the umbrella of gameplay, produced tangible,
  • September

    A single day of volunteering makes a giant difference

    Day in and day out, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District works to ensure that visitors to our Corps parks and lakes are able to enjoy nature at its best. That means a year-round effort by park rangers and staff to keep these lakes, rivers, recreation areas and campsites free of trash and in working order. Once a year, however, many visitors return to our parks, and some come for the first time, to lend a helping hand in the ongoing effort to maintain public lands.
  • 7 things you need to know about Natomas

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will complete improvements to the remaining 24 of 42 miles of levees surrounding the Natomas basin near Sacramento, Calif., one the most at-risk regions in the nation for catastrophic flooding.
  • August

    Employee Spotlight: Jesse Jordan

    Please introduce yourself:My name is Jesse Jordan. I’m originally from Trinidad but moved around a bit before finally settling in sunny Florida for high school and college. I earned a degree in civil engineering from Florida Tech in 2011 and immediately got a job working in the oil field as a technician out in the Gulf of Mexico. After a few years