image - construction at Folsom Dam
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  • April

    Natomas levee improvements hit high gear

    With the Sacramento River to its west, and the American River to the south, the Natomas Basin sits at the confluence of two major waterways. Streams, creeks and tributaries mark the northern and eastern boundary. Water surrounds the basin’s perimeter. Levees help keep flowing waters in their channels and out of growing neighborhoods, where approximately 100,000 people live, but a breach to any section of the 42 miles of levee surrounding Natomas could be catastrophic.
  • Folsom Dam Auxiliary Spillway recognized as Outstanding Water Project

    The American Society of Civil Engineers California Region recognized the Folsom Dam auxiliary spillway project as the state’s Outstanding Water Project for 2016 at an awards ceremony held in Los Angeles last month. The honor specifically highlights construction of the auxiliary spillway’s control structure. The structure, basically a second dam, will complement the functions of Folsom’s existing dam by allowing water to be released earlier and more safely from the reservoir during a high water event.
  • July

    Corps geologist learns the ropes

    It’s said a really good geologist needs to know a bit of everything: physics, chemistry, geography, math, biology, engineering … and how about climbing skills that would make Spiderman jealous? Read about Coralie Wilhite, a Sacramento District engineer on her way up!
  • April

    Corps a leading federal ecosystem restoration agency in Lake Tahoe Basin

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is one of the leading federal ecosystem restoration agencies in the Lake Tahoe Basin and has worked with local, state and other federal partners since 1997 to preserve the lake’s prized clarity by restoring natural inflows and controlling invasive species. Corps involvement in the Lake Tahoe Basin is shaped by two programs -- the Tahoe Partnership and the Tahoe Section 108 programs.
  • March

    The Workforce Awakens -- Millennials find their “Pathway” to success

    There is a tremor in the workforce. With a swell of retirement-eligible baby boomers leading the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, a new band of heroes face a stiff challenge to quickly transform into future leaders of our nation’s premier public engineering agency. A collection of young professionals born from 1981-1996, millennials hold a cosmic cloud of information at their fingertips and are finding a new “Pathway” to success, designed to make them the most well-trained decision makers the Corps has ever seen.