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Category: Sacramento District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
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  • November

    Soldier with 1340th Engineer Combat Battalion remembered for series of WWII contributions

    Army Sgt. William Farrar landed with his engineer combat battalion on Omaha Beach on D-Day – June 6, 1944 – at the beginning of the largest seaborne invasion in history that left about 4,500 Allied soldiers confirmed dead.After spending the first night shivering in shallow foxholes in a small draw 200 yards from the water’s edge, Farrar and his
  • October

    National Disability Employment Awareness Month: Diversity and inclusion fuels innovation

    For Vanessa Niño-Tapia, a civil engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District, October’s National Disability Employment Awareness Month serves as a powerful reminder of how far she has come as a person, an engineer and an employee.In 2020, Niño-Tapia was awarded the Sacramento District’s prestigious Hattie Peterson Inspiration
  • Did You Know … U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is a major provider of clean energy?

    You walk into your home and flip a switch. Presto, the room fills with light. But think about what actually powers your home, creating the ability to turn on lights, use your ovens, have air conditioning, and that precious cup of morning coffee …Electricity obviously has to be produced and brought through powerlines to countless millions of homes
  • September

    Rescued bird steals hearts before its return to nature

    Temperatures were pushing 100 degrees by noon in East Sacramento on July 9. Still, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District’s contractors and construction workers made steady progress on the Sacramento River East Levee project, until a contractor noticed something out of place.Among the bustle of activity, contract worker Roberto Navarez
  • Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

    September 15 - October 15 is National Hispanic American Heritage Month We celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month to recognize the achievements and contributions of Hispanic American champions who have inspired others to achieve success. The observation began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988.
  • August

    Veterans bring legacy of service to USACE

    SACRAMENTO, California -- Veterans make up around 31 percent of the federal workforce—but did you know that in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, that number is even higher?Former members of the armed forces make up about 40 percent of the USACE workforce, and that’s not counting the active duty members of USACE.Many veterans continue to serve in
  • South Pacific Division leaders reflect on Women's Equality Day

    Women's Equality Day, celebrated annually on August 26, commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920, granting women the right to vote. This effort to gain legal recognition as equal citizens had its formal beginning in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, where the first women’s rights convention was held.
  • Veteran’s advocate sees dream of medical complex become reality

    On July 16, Faustino “Tino” Adame stood alongside fellow veterans savoring a close-up look at the VA Community Based Outpatient Clinic currently under construction in Stockton, California.It’s taken Adame nearly three decades of advocating to see the clinic become a reality, but his staunch commitment to veterans goes back even further.In 1966, at
  • July

    Splitting a levee to make it stronger: Installing cutoff walls

    By now, just about everyone in the Sacramento & Natomas regions should know they’re living in one of the most at-risk areas in the nation for flooding. The region is literally ringed with levees that prevent neighborhoods from becoming Venice without the gondolas.The potential for catastrophic flooding is why U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento
  • Did You Know … USACE helps clean up sites containing unexploded military ordnance?

    Throughout the past two centuries, large sections of land have been used across the United States for training military personnel. In order to ensure our forces are fully prepared and our equipment will function as intended, many parcels of land have also been used for live-fire exercises. Not only that, but unexploded ordnance dating as far back