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Posted 2/15/2011

Release no. 11-006


Contact
Hunter Merritt
916-557-5119
hunter.merritt@usace.army.mil

EASTMAN LAKE, Calif. – The Lakeview Trail at Eastman Lake has been closed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District and will remain closed until Aug. 14 to protect a pair of nesting bald eagles. Park rangers have posted closure signs on the trail at the Raymond Bridge and Codorniz Recreation Area trailheads.

 

The eagles, which began sitting on their nest Feb. 11, are sensitive to human activity. Any disturbance could result in nest abandonment or flushing the young from the nest. The young birds are expected to fledge sometime this summer.

 

One pair of resident bald eagles, which have been nesting at Eastman Lake since 1993, is recognized as one of the most consistently productive nests in California. The nest identified this year is believed to belong to a new breeding pair.

 

Bald Eagles are protected under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The Corps is committed to the preservation of endangered and threatened species to aid in the successful survival of species for future generations. The public can assist in the successful survival of these birds by complying with the closure.

 

Road access and campgrounds in the Codorniz and Wildcat recreation areas continue to be closed due to a rock slide and hillside repair work on County Road 29 within the park.

 

Eastman Lake apologizes for any inconvenience the closure will have on our visitors. For more information regarding the closures at Eastman Lake, please call (559) 689-3255. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 

Eastman Lake is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District. The Corps is the nation’s largest federal provider of outdoor and water-based recreation, hosting more than 370 million visitors per year at more than 400 lakes and river projects.